Category —
Process

Forget automation: Do everything manually

Written by Paul on May 14th, 2010

Jason Cohen’s analysis of “marketplace” business models is fantastic, but this gem is the most important:

But just because automation is the goal doesn’t mean it’s the way to start. The good thing about automation is it’s efficient; the bad thing is you cannot learn because you’re not involved in the process. And at the start, learning is where you should be spending most of your time!

For example, when SpareFoot

Making money on the web, a brief howto

Written by Paul on October 22nd, 2008

If you’re a business and you’re on the web, chances are that you’ve heard all about the importance of having a RSS feed, newsletter signup, social networking links and a million other things. More importantly, you’ve probably installed a bunch of these on your site without considering how you’ll actually use them to make some money. (After all, isn’t that why you decided to get your business on the web in the first place?)

Based on a number of websites I’ve …

When Being Behind The Curve Can Be Smart

Written by Paul on October 11th, 2008

A BusinessWeek article points out that tech that doesn’t work won’t let us work. Well said.

Working 90% to 95% of the time is not working. When my company’s services fail to deliver, we don’t get paid—and our customers get angry. When a technology product doesn’t do what it’s supposed to do all the time, we’re stuck. Unfortunately, the technology my company buys fails way too much. But like everything else that makes me angry, I just deal with it.

Getting ahead should be routine

Written by Paul on July 13th, 2008

In this month’s Inc. magazine, A.G. Lafley, CEO of Procter & Gamble and Ram Charan took on a toy company with $4 million in revenue and 30 employees. The result was a seven-step routine for innovation:

  1. Select the strategy: Looking for an underserved market.
  2. Connect to customers: The social network as idea collector.
  3. Generate ideas: Brain-storming done right.
  4. Select an idea: Time to separate the good from the great.
  5. Prototype and test: Bring on the customers.
  6. Go to market: Cookies versus cookie dough.
  7. Adjust for growth:

Getting Ahead Should Be Routine

Written by Paul on June 5th, 2008

An article in this month’s Inc. magazine challenged A.G. Lafley, CEO of Procter & Gamble and Ram Charan to take on a toy company with $4 million in revenue and 30 employees. The result was a seven-step routine for innovation:

  1. Select the strategy: Looking for an underserved market.
  2. Connect to customers: The social network as idea collector.
  3. Generate ideas: Brain-storming done right.
  4. Select an idea: Time to separate the good from the great.
  5. Prototype and test: Bring on the customers.
  6. Go to market: Cookies versus

Welcome new I Will Teach You To Be Rich Readers

Written by Paul on April 22nd, 2008

If you’re visiting from the latest I Will Teach You To Be Rich post on Why the lady sitting next to me should pay $2,000 for a computer class, welcome.

This is a blog on entrepreneurial productivity, growth and effectiveness for young professionals, seasoned pros, and everyone else. Simply put, this is a blog about getting results.

Here’s a quick guide to get started:

Some recent popular articles

My First Job: What I Learned Making Pizzas

Written by Paul on April 9th, 2008

Pizza MakingMy first job was at a Papa John’s Pizza in northern Virginia. Not only was making pizzas the only employment available to me, it was my favorite food at the time. What better way to make my first few paychecks?

It’s All About the Process
On my first day, each new employee would get a manual – a freakin’ MANUAL. This thing contained exact measurements, diagrams, pictures and clear …

Some lessons I wish I learned earlier in life

Written by Paul on April 4th, 2008

As I get older, I realize I’ve learned some lessons that I wish I had picked up sooner in life. Most of these lessons were learned through experience, many through the various mentors (Thanks, guys!) I’ve had along the way and a few from various books I’ve read here and there.

When most people today hear the word “lesson,” they usually don’t think of it as a good thing. Teaching a lesson may be looked at as being bossy or perhaps …

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